By paulgillin | June 3, 2009 - 6:55 am - Posted in Business News, NewMedia, R.I.P.

The Philadelphia Bulletin, a conservative weekday paper with a small but loyal following, shut down abruptly yesterday, idling 25 workers.

This is actually the second time a Bulletin in Philadelphia has closed. The first time was in 1982, but Thomas Rice bought up the name and relaunched the Bulletin as “Philadelphia’s Family Paper” in 2004.

By most accounts, the new  Bulletin struggled from the start. Staffers said paychecks were often late. Ads were scarce. Critics complained of questionable fact-checking and a tendency for the Bulletin to select wire service stories that cast liberals in a  poor light. 

The Bulletin retained its predecessor’s famous slogan, “In Philadelphia Nearly Everybody Reads the Bulletin,” but that stretched the truth. The paper claimed a circulation of 100,000, but the numbers weren’t audited and staffers said they didn’t know how many copies were actually paid for. Columnist Herb Denenberg says he’s never actually seen a copy.

The Bulletin‘s website doesn’t mention news of the closure and Rice was unavailable for comment. 

The Bulletin struggled in a hostile environment and a market that’s barely able to support two daily papers, let alone three. In that respect, the story is reminiscent of the New York Sun, a weekday paper serving Wall Street that shut down last October.

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009 at 6:55 am and is filed under Business News, NewMedia, R.I.P.. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

13 Comments

  1. June 3, 2009 @ 1:30 pm



    […] via RIP Philadelphia Bulletin | Newspaper Death Watch. […]

  2. June 3, 2009 @ 2:12 pm



    You would think a news paper who shut down would let people know on their Web Site and would allow for you to sign up for new and gift subscriptions. Weird.

    Posted by EoinF2
  3. June 3, 2009 @ 2:13 pm



    I meant wouldn’t allow you to sign up for new and gift subscriptions. Their site still does.

    Posted by EoinF2
  4. June 3, 2009 @ 10:18 pm



    I suspect the last thing on their minds is taking down the circulation promotion.

    Posted by paulgillin
  5. June 18, 2009 @ 10:37 am



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  8. May 8, 2011 @ 10:13 am



    I think the Inquire couldn’t take the competition!!!! It makes you wonder about freedom of the press in Philadelphia..

    Posted by s rose
  9. July 7, 2011 @ 3:44 pm



    I hold an insurance policy i paid for a a paper boy. Is this still a valid paid-up policy? It has a face value off 475.00 that i dillently paid for. I am 74 yrs old. I held on to this policy. If the Bulletin doesn’t exist is this policy not worth the paper it’s written on.

    Posted by austin Haeberle
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  12. September 16, 2012 @ 3:59 pm



    As a child I remember(50’60’s) my mother (Kensigton) always telling me that she paid for a Insurnce Policy for me and she was so pround it was paid for. The insurance policy was sold by the Phila Bulliten and she paid for it weekly. It know it was for a small amount but is the principal of sacrafice that she put money aside for me every week to pay for it. Does anyone know where I could find out what insurance company it was. It would be something I could pass along to my family that was paid for by thier great- grandmother.

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  13. January 13, 2013 @ 5:24 pm



    WHEN I WAS A KID GROWING UP IN KENSIGTON IN PHILA.EVERYONE READ THE BILLITEN,WE DID’NT KNOW THERE WERE ANY ORTHER PAPERS AROUND.SORRY TO SEE THE ”OLD PAPER ”GO

    Posted by EARL MILLER